Systematic layout planning of wineries: the case of Rioja region (Spain)

  • Javier Gómez Faber 1900, Logroño; Department of Agriculture and Food, University of La Rioja, Spain.
  • Alberto Tascón | alberto.tascon@unirioja.es Department of Agriculture and Food, University of La Rioja, Spain.
  • Francisco Ayuga Department of Agroforestry Engineering, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

Winery design can be very varied - the consequence of different influences acting at different times of construction. Unlike the designs of other food industries, those of wineries are commonly influenced by aesthetics - sometimes to potentiate wine tourism, and sometimes to safeguard the agricultural landscape of which they are part. However, the functionality of the production space cannot be ignored; the efficient distribution of space in a winery contributes towards both economic and environmental sustainability - two requisites of an ever more demanding and competitive market. The present work gathers qualitative and quantitative information on the design of industrial wineries in Spain’s Rioja winemaking region. Different classes of winery are identified and, using the systematic layout planning method, several type layouts proposed. With the necessary adaptations made to suit particular circumstances, these could be used to guide future winery design in the same and other winemaking areas.

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Author Biographies

Javier Gómez, Faber 1900, Logroño; Department of Agriculture and Food, University of La Rioja
Dr. Eng., Senior Design Engineer
Alberto Tascón, Department of Agriculture and Food, University of La Rioja
Dr. Ing., Associate Professor
Francisco Ayuga, Department of Agroforestry Engineering, Polytechnic University of Madrid
Dr. Eng., Professor
Published
2018-04-05
Section
Original Articles
Keywords:
Design, plant layout, Rioja wine, winery.
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How to Cite
Gómez, J., Tascón, A., & Ayuga, F. (2018). Systematic layout planning of wineries: the case of Rioja region (Spain). Journal of Agricultural Engineering, 49(1), 34-41. https://doi.org/10.4081/jae.2018.778